Politics

Syria Receives Humanitarian Help for the First Time in Four Years

Daraya receives medicine after the USA, France and the UK put pressure on the UN

June 07th, 2016
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On Wednesday 1st of June, Daraya, a rebel-controlled Syrian city, received UN help for the first time in four years. 

The USA, France, and the UK appealed to the UN to start providing humanitarian help in this area. After a 48-hour truce was arranged, the United Nations and the Red Cross managed to get medicine supplies to Daraya, a city that has been cut off for the last four years.

Since the ceasefire, established on 27th February (a compromise that has been violated several times), the government has occasionally allowed external help to reach some parts of the country. Yet not to Daraya, a city which was taken four years ago by the rebels, and which has already lost 90% of its population. After multiple appeals from the population and several humanitarian organisations, medical support finally has arrived.

However, according to Sonia Khush, the head of the organisation “Save the Children”, this help is not enough. She declared that “although it is a good news that Daraya's habitants have gotten their first supply since 2012, at the same time it's completely shocking and unacceptable that the trucks were not allowed to carry food.” Daraya is known for having a very poor and malnourished population.

According to the information provided by the NGO “Save the Children”, there are over 4.5 million people living in enclosed areas in Syria, who have been deprived of outside help since 2012. Last month only 3% of the population received UN assistance.

The UN Security Council will meet Friday 3rd of June to debate the air supply distribution situation. The spokesman for the United States Department of State, John Kirby, declared that hundreds of thousands of Syrians need to have “regular and sustained” access to humanitarian aid, also adding that the United Nations World Food Program (WFP) has already provided the American Government the guidelines for doing so.

References

Cultural Diplomacy News
Beatriz Nunes, CD News